Trainer's Support System

Here you can connect with Trainers, access essential competence development Resources, utilize our Glossary of trainer's terms, and find answers to FAQ

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  •    Resources  
  •     Glossary    
  •         FAQ        
     Trainers     
Coaching / Mentoring / Job Shadowing

Enhance your training competencies through personalized guidance. Connect with experienced professionals offering coaching, mentoring, and job shadowing services.

Our members are advanced trainers who can support you in developing specific skills or competencies. Please contact them directly, thanks and good luck!

It’s Time to Trio!

Trio’s are peer support groups of three trainers who assist each other in feedback, interpretation, insights, extraction, and professional development planning.


The Trio peer support concept was pioneered by the International Youth Work Trainers Guild and forms a crucial part of the 360 assessment process, accessible via the Appraiser platform. Once you've gained clarity on your current competencies, convene with your trio to devise a development strategy collaboratively.


How to find your Trio?

Identify and connect with two other individuals from the provided lists above. We recommend selecting colleagues with whom you haven't collaborated extensively before. Initiate contact and establish a mutual agreement to form a trio.


More guidelines for Trios can be found here

   Resources  
  • All
  • European-framework
  • Competence-development
  • Wellbeing-for-trainers
  • Other
European framework
European Training Strategy

European Training Strategy (ETS) for Youth Work 2021-2027 - A strategic framework for the development of youth worker education and training in Europe under the Erasmus+ Youth and the European Solidarity Corps programmes.


Download Publication

ETS Competence Model for Trainers

Trainers are a core element when it comes to European youth work, particularly in the field of non-formal learning. Their professional expertise combined with their ability to perform within an educational framework affect the quality of training activities in a crucial way. This is why the Competence Model for Trainers was developed as part of the European Training Strategy.


The ETS Competence Model for Trainers working at an international level helps raise the quality of training programmes and related trainer competences in the field of youth work, covering seven competence areas:

  1. Understanding and facilitating individual and group learning processes
  2. Learning to learn
  3. Designing educational programmes
  4. Cooperating successfully in teams
  5. Communicating meaningfully with others
  6. Intercultural competence
  7. Being civically engaged
SALTO Training and Cooperation

SALTO Training and Cooperation supports the European Commission and the National Agencies in developing and implementing the European Training Strategy (ETS) and the Youthpass strategy. 

Competence development for trainers
AppRaiser - Competence development platform for trainers

AppRaiser platform offers free solutions for professional development, which includes self-assessment and feedback from participants, colleagues and organisers. The platform is adapted to the needs and practices of trainers in the youth field, there you can:

  • Assess your competences. Create your trainer profile and define your core competences. Assess your performance based on the ETS Competence Model for Trainers. Gather evidence that supports your professionalism.
  • Easily collect feedback. List your training events and invite participants, colleagues and organisers to give feedback. Access and review the feedback about your competences. Obtain visual data based on the feedback you received.
  • Take charge of your professional development. Identify areas for further professional development Set learning goals and organise resources accordingly Follow your learning progress with the support of your colleague trainers


YouTrain - videos for non-formal education

“YouTrain” is a long-term strategic partnership, that aims to increase the quality, reach and impact of non-formal education activities by creating a video toolbox for educators, and by promoting the use and production of educational video-tutorials in general. On the YouTube channel of the project, you may find introductory videos on important aspects and considerations in non-formal education, a set of video tutorials on specific methods in non-formal education, and a manual on how to produce video-tutorials by yourself.

Trainers Library

Trainers Library Project resource center from which trainers could develop their skills and competencies. The Trainers Library uses the European trainers competence model as a skeleton to organize the learning there are seven competence areas in the model and for each area, we have written or curated 50 articles which should help the trainers where they develop their competences we have written 350 articles on more than 1500 pages designed in such a way that everyone can easily find what they need in the library. The library will serve as a crowd-sourced resource center for all trainers working with non-formal education within the Erasmus+ program.

FOCUS learning

The FOCUS learning is a resource for youth workers, trainers and educators. It combines a publication with various practical tools on the topic of learning in youth work. The publication and the large quantity of materials contained within are designed to be easily accessed and used by youth workers, lecturers, and trainers. The resources can be used for workshops, training courses, teaching, and conferences.

Wellbeing for trainers
Physical wellbeing

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Mental wellbeing

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Life on the Road

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Other
Trainers Competence Cards for Self-Assessment

Hold your Aces - the competence cards have been developed to support and promote the self-assessment process of trainers and facilitators to accompany their professional development.

    Glossary    
Abbreviations

COMETS - COMpetence development European Training Strategy in the field of youth

EECA - Eastern Europe and Caucasus

ETS - European Training Strategy

MOOC - Massive Open Online Course

NA - National Agency

SALTO - Support, Advanced Learning and Training Opportunities for Youth

SALTO EEC - Eastern Europe and Caucasus

SALTO ESC - European Solidarity Corp

SALTO Euromed - European and Mediterranean regions

SALTO ID - Inclusion and Diversity

SALTO PI - Participation and Information

SALTO SEE - South East Europe

SALTO T&C - Training and Cooperation

SNAC – Strategic National Agencies’ Cooperation

TCD - Trainers' Competence Development

TOTHRE - Training of Trainers in Human Rights Education

TOY - Trainers Online for Youth

TRAYCE - Training of Trainers For Youth In The Council Of Europe

TSW - Trainer´s Skills Workshops

ToT - Training of Trainers

Glossary of trainer's terms
  • All
  • A-D
  • F-I
  • J-L
  • M-N
  • P-Q
  • S-Q
  • Y
A-D

Basic skills 

Literacy, mathematics, science and technology; these skills are included in the key competences.

Blended mobility 

Combination of physical mobility and a virtual component, facilitating collaborative online learning exchange/teamwork.

Coach 

A resource person - not member of the group – who supports young people in the preparation, implementation and evaluation of their project.


Competence

The term ‘competences’ refers to a system of values, attitudes and beliefs, and skills and knowledge that can be applied in practice to manage various complex situations and tasks successfully. Confidence, motivation and well-being are important prerequisites for someone wishing to successfully apply developed competences.


Digital competence 

Involves the confident, critical and responsible use of, and engagement with, digital technologies for learning, at work, and for participation in society. It includes information and data literacy, communication and collaboration, media literacy, digital content creation (including programming), safety (including digital well-being and competences related to cybersecurity), intellectual property related questions, problem solving and critical thinking.


Digital Youth Work 

Proactively using or addressing digital media and technology in youth work. Digital media and technology can be either a tool, an activity or a content in youth work. Digital youth work is not a youth work method, it can be included in any youth work setting and it has the same goals as youth work in general.

F-I

Facilitator 

A person who helps a group of (young) people to work together better, understand their common objectives, and plan how to achieve these objectives through Erasmus+ activities


Formal education

Formal education is a form of purpose-driven learning that takes place in a distinct institutionalised environment. This environment is designed for teaching/training and learning, is staffed by qualified and examined educators, is geared towards specific topics and levels, and usually serves a clearly defined category of learners (age, level and specialisation). Formal education (and hence formal learning) is organised and formalised by means of national curricula. Formal education is built up in a way that allows successful students to move up to the next level and obtain a corresponding degree, diploma or certificate. Typical formal education institutions include primary and secondary schools, vocational colleges and universities. Most formal learning is compulsory. 


Green skills 

Fundamental skills to the transition to a low-carbon economy, which can be general such as sustainable agriculture, soil protection, energy use and waste reduction, or more technical such as knowledge on renewable energy.


Identity

Identity is understood as a cluster of elements and dimensions that define an individual at certain times and in certain situations, contexts and settings. Identity encompasses not only dimensions such as gender, sex, persona, culture and ethnicity, but also includes processes such as identity (personality) change and social transformation. Developing ones’ identity is a dynamic process. 


Informal learning

Learning resulting from daily activities and experiences which is not organised or structured in terms of objectives, time or learning support, predetermined learning settings, or educational materials. It may be unintentional from the learner’s perspective. Informal learning takes place in everyday contexts in the family, at work, during leisure time and within the community. While informal learning does have outcomes, these are rarely recorded, virtually never certified, and are typically not immediately visible to the learner. These informal learning outcomes do not necessarily have an inherent value for formal education, training or employment purposes. 


Intercultural competence

Intercultural competence as developed and demonstrated within the framework of youth work includes a set of qualities that people need so they can live in contemporary, pluralistic societies. It enables them to actively confront social injustice and discrimination and promote and protect human rights. Intercultural competence requires an understanding of culture as a dynamic, multifaceted process. In addition, it calls for an increased sense of solidarity that allows individuals to negotiate their insecurity and fear of the ‘other’ e.g. through critical thinking, empathy and by accepting ambiguity. 

J-L

Job shadowing 

A stay at a partner organisation in another country with the aim of receiving training by following practitioners in their daily work in the receiving organisation, exchanging good practices, acquiring skills and knowledge and/or building long-term partnerships through participative observation.


Key competences 

The basic set of knowledge, skills and attitudes which all individuals need for personal fulfilment and development, employability, social inclusion, sustainable lifestyle, successful life in peaceful societies, health-conscious life management and active citizenship, as described in the Council Recommendation 2018/C 189/01 of 22 May 2018 on key competences for lifelong learning.


Learner 

A learner is a participant in the learning process. The training is always targeted towards the learner and his/her competences are developed through it. The terms ‘training participant’ or ‘trainee’ are often used as synonyms. Learning Learning is a process that results in permanent social transformation and change in a learner’s competences and actions. Learning allows them to become a more experienced, self-aware and self-directed individual. Based on Kolb’s experiential learning cycle, one of the learning cycles that can be observed in many youth work situations encompasses the following four steps: observe, stop, reflect, and adapt. 


Life-long learning 

Learning in all its forms, whether formal, non-formal or informal, taking place at all stages in life and resulting in an improvement or update in knowledge, skills, competences and attitudes or participation in society from a personal, civic, cultural, social or employment-related perspective, including the provision of counselling and guidance services; it includes early childhood education and care, general education, vocational education and training, higher education, adult education, youth work and other learning settings outside formal education and training and it typically promotes cross-sectoral cooperation and flexible learning pathways.


Learning mobility 

Moving physically to a country other than the country of residence, in order to undertake study, training or non-formal, or informal learning


Learning outcomes 

Statements of what a participant knows, understands and is able to do on completion of a learning process, which are defined in terms of knowledge, skills and competence.

M-N

Meaningfulness

In this model we use the term meaningfulness as the capacity to clearly express an emotion or an idea with or without words. Meaningfulness also refers to something that is important, that has a value (for a person, for a group of persons) and that relates to a purpose. For some, meaningfulness goes hand in hand with the notion of mindfulness, meaning the ability to remain fully present and aware in the ‘here and now’, acknowledging and accepting one’s feelings, thoughts, and bodily sensations in a non-judgmental manner. 


Micro-credential 

A micro-credential is a recognised proof of the learning outcomes that a learner has achieved following a short learning experience, according to transparent standards and requirements and upon assessment. The proof is contained in a certified document that lists the name of the holder, the achieved learning outcomes, the assessment method, the awarding body and, where applicable, the qualifications framework level and the credits gained. Micro-credentials are owned by the learner, are shareable, portable and may be combined into larger credentials or qualifications.


MOOC 

Stands for "Massive Open Online Course," a type of course that is completely delivered online, is open to be accessed by anyone without cost, entry qualifications or other restrictions; participant numbers are often high. These courses can have in-person components, e.g. encouraging local participant meetings, and formal assessment, but tend to use peer review, self-assessment and automated grading. There are many variations of MOOCs, focused on specific sectors, target groups (e.g. vocational focus, teachers, etc.) or teaching methods. MOOCs funded under Erasmus+ have to be open to all and both the participation and a certificate or badge of completion are free of charge for participants. The open access requirement for educational resources applies also to MOOCs and other complete courses.


National Agency 

A designated body in charge of managing the implementation of the Programme at national level in a Member State or in a third country associated to the Programme. One or more National Agencies may exist in each country.


Non-formal learning 

Non-formal learning is a targeted learning process that supports the development of an individual: their social transformation, potential, creativity, talents, initiative and social responsibility as well as the acquisition of relevant knowledge, skills, attitudes and values. It is understood as a form of learning that takes place outside institutional contexts (e.g. school). Non-formal learning in youth work settings is often structured, based on learning objectives, takes place during a certain period of time, involves specific learning support, and is intentional (and voluntary). Non-formal learning is based on a series of educational values and principles.

P-Q

Job shadowing 

A stay at a partner organisation in another country with the aim of receiving training by following practitioners in their daily work in the receiving organisation, exchanging good practices, acquiring skills and knowledge and/or building long-term partnerships through participative observation.


Key competences 

The basic set of knowledge, skills and attitudes which all individuals need for personal fulfilment and development, employability, social inclusion, sustainable lifestyle, successful life in peaceful societies, health-conscious life management and active citizenship, as described in the Council Recommendation 2018/C 189/01 of 22 May 2018 on key competences for lifelong learning.


Learner 

A learner is a participant in the learning process. The training is always targeted towards the learner and his/her competences are developed through it. The terms ‘training participant’ or ‘trainee’ are often used as synonyms. Learning Learning is a process that results in permanent social transformation and change in a learner’s competences and actions. Learning allows them to become a more experienced, self-aware and self-directed individual. Based on Kolb’s experiential learning cycle, one of the learning cycles that can be observed in many youth work situations encompasses the following four steps: observe, stop, reflect, and adapt. 


Life-long learning 

Learning in all its forms, whether formal, non-formal or informal, taking place at all stages in life and resulting in an improvement or update in knowledge, skills, competences and attitudes or participation in society from a personal, civic, cultural, social or employment-related perspective, including the provision of counselling and guidance services; it includes early childhood education and care, general education, vocational education and training, higher education, adult education, youth work and other learning settings outside formal education and training and it typically promotes cross-sectoral cooperation and flexible learning pathways.


Learning mobility 

Moving physically to a country other than the country of residence, in order to undertake study, training or non-formal, or informal learning


Learning outcomes 

Statements of what a participant knows, understands and is able to do on completion of a learning process, which are defined in terms of knowledge, skills and competence.

S-V

Smart Youth Work 

The innovative development of youth work encompassing digital youth work practice, and including a research, quality and policy component.


Traineeship (work placement) 

Time spent in an enterprise or organisation in another country, with a view to acquiring specific competences that are needed by the labour market, gaining work experience and acquiring more understanding of the economic and social culture of that country.


Trainers in the youth field

‘Trainer’ is traditionally used to refer to those who shape, guide and accompany the learning processes of individuals or groups. Training in the youth field means a targeted educational activity based on the principles and values of youth work and nonformal learning. In the youth field, trainers design and implement educational activities based on the values and principles of youth work and non-formal learning. They support each individuals development by promoting the acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes and values - according to the topic they are working on.


Transversal (soft; life) skills 

Include the ability to think critically, be curious and creative, to take initiative, to solve problems and work collaboratively, to be able to communicate efficiently in a multicultural and interdisciplinary environment, to be able to adapt to context and to cope with stress and uncertainty. These skills are part of the key competences.


Validation of non-formal and informal learning 

A process of confirmation by an authorised body that an individual has acquired learning outcomes measured against a relevant standard and consists of the following four distinct phases:

1. Identification through dialogue of particular experiences of an individual;

2. Documentation to make visible the individual's experiences;

3. A formal assessment of these experiences; and

4. Certification of the results of the assessment which may lead to a partial or full qualification


Values in non-formal learning

‘Values in non-formal learning’ means a set of convictions and beliefs that guide the choices and approaches applied in non-formal learning. In the youth field, the values of non-formal learning are connected to personal development (e.g., independence, critical thinking, openness, curiosity, creativity), social development (e.g., the ability to interact, participative 17 democracy, solidarity and social justice, responsibility, problem-solving) and ethics (e.g., acceptance of others, human rights, intercultural learning, intercultural dialogue, peace and non-violent behaviour, gender equality, and intergenerational dialogue). 


Virtual learning 

Acquisition of knowledge, skills and competences through the use of information and communication technology tools that allow participants to have a meaningful transnational or international learning experience.

Y

Youth and young people 

The UN probably has the most flexible definition of youth: ‘YOUTH is best understood as a period of transition from the dependence of childhood to adulthood’s independence. That’s why, as a category, youth is more fluid than other fixed agegroups. Yet, age is the easiest way to define this group, particularly in relation to education and employment, because “youth” is often referred to a person between the ages of leaving compulsory education, and finding their first job’. From a psychological perspective, young people are persons in the age range of 20 to 35, although youth starts earlier if we include the period of adolescence. Erik Erikson (1959) distinguishes the following stages of psychosocial development: the young adult stage (from 13 to 39) precedes early adulthood (from 20 to 39) and this precedes middle adulthood (from 40 to 64). Daniel Levinson (1978) and Rhona Rapoport (1980) add that ‘[…] for a variety of reasons, timeliness on young adulthood cannot be exactly defined – producing different results according to the different mix of overlapping indices (legal, maturational, occupational, sexual, emotional and the like) employed, or on whether a developmental perspective [… or] the socialisation perspective is taken’. For Erikson, the psychological crisis during adolescence is about ‘fidelity’. Young people ask themselves the existential question: ‘Who am I and what can I be?’ They learn to position themselves in relationship with others.


Neuroscience defines adolescence as the ‘[…] period between the physical changes during puberty and the capacity of an individual to play an independent role in society’ (Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, 2008). 


Youth activity 

An out-of-school activity (such as youth exchange, volunteering or youth training) carried out by a young person, either individually or in a group, in particular through youth organisations, and characterised by a non-formal learning approach.


Youth work 

Youth work involves leisure related activities and non-formal and informal learning processes. A young persons engagement in youth work is on a voluntary participation basis. It promotes young people’s development in a multi-faceted manner, enabling them to become active outside their families, formal education, and work. Youth work activities and processes are self-managed, co-managed or managed under the guidance of youth workers. Youth work is organised and delivered in different ways (e.g., by youth-led organisations, youth organisations and informal groups, and by youth services and public authorities) and can be found at the local, regional, national and European levels. 


Youth worker

A youth worker is a professional or a volunteer who works with young people in a wide variety of contexts. Typically they focus on the personal and social development of the young people they work with through one-on-one relationships and group-based activities. The role can include the facilitating of non-formal learning, support in understanding an informal learning moment, being a listener, having a limited social worker role, being a mentor and or role model… 


Youthpass 

The European tool to improve the recognition of the learning outcomes of young people and youth workers from their participation in projects supported by the Erasmus+ Programme. Youthpass consists of: a) certificates that can be obtained by participants in several Actions of the Programme; and b) a defined process which supports young people, youth workers and youth organisations to reflect about the learning outcomes from an Erasmus+ project in the field of youth and non-formal learning. Youthpass is also part of a broader European Commission strategy which aims to enhance the recognition of non-formal and informal learning and of youth work in Europe and beyond.

        FAQ        
Who is a trainer?

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How to become a trainer?

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How ?

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We do not guarantee the accuracy or currency of content on these linked pages.

Consortium

The project has been created and implemented by an international consortium of four organisations.


International Youth Work Trainers Guild, Germany


Coobra - Cooperativa Braccianti, Austria


Magnet House / Balkan Idea, Serbia


Team MAIS, Portugal

Funding

The project is co-funded by the European Union through Jugend für Europa, the German National Agency for ERASMUS+ and the European Solidarity Corps. Views and opinions expressed are however those of the author(s) only and do not necessarily reflect those of the European Union or JUGEND für Europa. Neither the European Union nor the granting authority can be held responsible for them.